'3 Days' a fatally compromised spy tale.

Byline: Geoff Berkshire

'3 Days to Kill'

Unstarred Review

A Relativity release

Rating: PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and action, some sensuality and language.

Running time: 1 hour, 53 minutes.

LOS ANGELES -- Even international spies have trouble balancing work and family life, according to ''3 Days to Kill,'' the latest lightweight action pic from writer-producer Luc Besson, here forming an unlikely (or perhaps unholy) trinity with director McG and star Kevin Costner. Surely the goal of the resulting tonal mishmash was to reignite Costner's career a la what happened for Liam Neeson after Besson's ''Taken,'' but any possibility of sleeper-hit status has been fatally compromised by watered-down fight scenes and misguided family man dramatics.

The setup plays as if someone (presumably Besson, who is credited with the story and co-wrote the script) decided to graft the central father-daughter relationship from ''The Descendants'' onto a Eurotrashy action framework. Superstar CIA field agent Ethan Renner (Costner) spends so much time on the job that he's completely missed watching his daughter, Zooey (Hailee Steinfeld), blossom into a sophisticated teenager.

After he's diagnosed with a fatal illness, Ethan retires and resolves to spend more time with his family in Paris, offering to watch Zooey for a weekend while his estranged wife, Christine (Connie Nielsen), is away. But retirement isn't so easy for a man of Ethan's skills, and he's promptly recruited by the mysterious Vivi (Amber Heard), who needs his help in the hunt for a terrorist mastermind in exchange for experimental drugs that could give Ethan a second lease on life.

The conflict between the finesse Ethan demonstrates in his professional duties and the complete incompetence with which he approaches parenting is meant to be comedic, although the film doesn't have the light touch of similar spy-family action-laffers like ''Mr. and Mrs. Smith,'' "True Lies'' or McG's own ''This Means War.''

Instead, ''3 Days to Kill'' proves surprisingly po-faced about trying to build the bond between Ethan and Zooey, even in the midst of moments as goofy as Dad consoling his daughter on a bad hair day, teaching her to dance or buying her a purple bicycle just because that was her favorite color as a kid. The sentimental approach almost works...

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